jeudi 16 avril 2015

Video: SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket still misses landing












SpaceX - Falcon 9/ Dragon CRS-6 Mission patch.

April 16, 2015

The first stage of the launch vehicle was scheduled to land on Tuesday to Earth for reuse. This is the third failure in as many attempts for the US company owned by billionaire Elon Musk.

SpaceX Falcon 9 crash on Tuesday April 14, 2015

The last mission entrusted to SpaceX is a partial success. Or partial failure. US private space company managed to take off its Falcon 9 rocket to resupply the International Space Station on Tuesday 14th April. The astronauts have received particular the first espresso machine sent into space. But the first stage of the launcher scheduled to return to Earth intact, has once again failed in his mission.

Incredible footage shows SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket crash landing

Three failures in as many attempts

As shown in the pictures from SpaceX, the launch vehicle attempted to land on an offshore platform off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida (USA). The rocket has slowed his fall with the approach of the site, and is well managed to ask. But his angle of approach, distorted by the side wind, caused a drop, causing an explosion and disintegration of the craft. This is the third time in as many attempts, the pitcher fails to return to Earth.


Image above: The 300-foot-long ship (Drone Barge) used for the landing attempt returned to port Jan. 12 in Jacksonville, Florida, showing no obvious signs of damage. Containers housing support equipment on the barge’s deck were blackened and crumpled from the blast of the second crash of the reusable rocket Falcon 9.

SpaceX for the success of this landing is crucial to the profitability of the company owned by billionaire Elon Musk. For recovering intact launcher would reuse for the next launch. Enough to drastically reduce the cost of space travel in the future.

For more information about SpaceX and Falcon 9 reusable rocket, visit: http://www.spacex.com/

Image, Video, Text, Credits: SpaceX/APTN/Orbiter.ch Aerospace.

Greetings, Orbiter.ch

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