mardi 29 septembre 2015

NASA Captures Typhoon Dujuan's Landfall in Southeastern China














NASA - EOS Aqua Mission logo / NASA - EOS Terra Mission patch.

Sept. 29, 2015

Tropical Storm Dujuan

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Dujuan as it made landfall in southeastern China.


Image above: The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Dujuan making landfall in southeastern China at 05:00 UTC (1 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 29. Image Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team.

On September 29 at 0300 UTC (Sept. 28 at 11 p.m. EDT), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued their final bulletin on Dujuan. At that time, the center of Dujuan was located near 25.3 North latitude and 118.6 East longitude, about 131 nautical miles west of Taipei, Taiwan.

Dujuan's maximum sustained winds were near 75 knots (86 mph/138.9 kph), making it still the strength of a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Dujuan was moving to the northwest at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph) and continued tracking inland.

When Aqua passed over Dujuan at 05:00 UTC (1 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 29, the strongest storms were on the eastern side of the storm, over the Taiwan Strait (the body of water between southeastern China and the island of Taiwan). Animated multispectral satellite imagery and radar imagery showed that the thunderstorms were weakening over the western quadrant of the storm.

Artist's concept of the Aqua satellite. Image Credits: NASA/GSFC

The National Meteorological Center (NMA) continued to issue orange warning of typhoon at 6:00 a.m. local time on September 29. For current warnings from the China's NMA, visit: http://www.cma.gov.cn/en2014/weather/Warnings/ActiveWarnings/201509/t20150929_294049.html

Dujuan is moving along the southwestern edge of a sub-tropical ridge or elongated area of high pressure and is forecast to move northward ahead of an approaching area of low pressure. Forecasters at the JTWC expect Dujuan to weaken quickly as it moves north and dissipate by October 1.

Sep. 28, 2015 - NASA Satellites Dissect Typhoon Dujuan Affecting Taiwan

NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites provided visible and infrared data on Typhoon Dujuan's clouds while NASA's RapidScat instrument analyzed the storm's powerful winds as it approached Taiwan.


Image above: The MODIS instrument aboard Terra captured a visible image of Typhoon Dujuan affecting Taiwan on Sept. 28 at 02:45 UTC. Image Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team.

At 8 a.m. EDT Sept. 27, RapidScat identified the strongest area of sustained winds in Typhoon Dujuan were around the center of circulation where they were near 45 meters per second (100 mph/162 kph). The data was analyzed and made into an image at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.


Image above: Sept. 27 at 17:17 UTC (1:17 p.m. EDT) the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite saw very cold, high, powerful thunderstorms (purple) with cloud top temperatures in excess of -81F/-63C/210K around the center of Dujuan. Image Credits: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen.

ISS-RapidScat in action. Animation Credit: NASA

JPL also analyzed infrared temperature data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. On Sept. 27 at 17:17 UTC (1:17 p.m. EDT) the AIRS instrument saw very cold, high, powerful thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures in excess of -81F/-63C/210K around the center of Dujuan. Cloud tops that cold have the ability to generate heavy rainfall.

For more information about Aqua satellite mission, visit: http://aqua.nasa.gov/

For more information about EOS Terra satellite mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/terra/index.html

For more information about ISS-RapidScat, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/iss-rapidscat/

Images (mentioned), Animation (mentioned), Text, Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Rob Gutro.

Greetings, Orbiter.ch

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