vendredi 15 avril 2016

BEAM Installation Work Begins Tonight












ISS - International Space Station logo.

April 15, 2016

BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, will be removed from the back of the SpaceX Dragon late tonight before installation on the Tranquility module begins early Saturday. Expansion of the new habitat module won’t occur until late May for two years of habitability tests.

Meanwhile, the six-member Expedition 47 crew kept up its very busy pace of advanced space research this week to benefit life on Earth and crews in space.


Image above: This computer rendering depicts the Canadarm2 robotic arm removing BEAM from the back of the Space X Dragon spacecraft. Image Credit: NASA.

More eye checks were on the schedule today as scientists continued exploring vision changes astronauts have experienced while on orbit. The crew also observed skeletal muscle cells with a microscope to help researchers identify gravity sensors that may prevent muscle atrophy in space. Saliva samples were collected for a Japanese experiment analyzing how an astronaut’s immune system adapts to long-term space missions.

The crew set up software for an experiment recording an astronaut’s cognitive performance during stressful conditions in space. They also answered questions about their station habitat providing insights to engineers to help them design spacecraft to meet the needs of future crews.

Related article and links:

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module: http://orbiterchspacenews.blogspot.ch/2016/04/nasa-to-attach-test-first-expandable.html

Skeletal muscle cells: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1207.html

Astronaut’s immune system: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1949.html

Cognitive performance: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1256.html

Station habitat: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1772.html

For more information about BEAM, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/beam

For more information about the International Space Station, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/station

Image (mentioned), Text, Credits: NASA/Mark Garcia.

Greetings, Orbiter.ch

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