vendredi 29 septembre 2017

Ariane 5 orbits Intelsat 37e and BSAT-4a on Arianespace’s latest mission from the Spaceport


















ARIANESPACE - Arine 5 ECA / Flight VA239 poster.


September 29, 2017

 Ariane 5 ECA Flight VA239 launch

Arianespace orbited telecommunications satellites for long-time customers on today’s successful mission – confirming the company’s role as a launch services leader in terms of availability, reliability and performance.

Ariane 5 ECA Flight VA239 at ELA-3 launch zone

Conducted from the Spaceport’s ELA-3 launch zone in French Guiana, the successful mission delivered an estimated payload lift performance of 10,838 kg. to geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) – utilizing the heavy-lift Ariane 5 member of Arianespace’s launcher family, which also includes the medium Soyuz and lightweight Vega.

Designated Flight VA239, the mission carried Intelsat 37e for global operator Intelsat; along with BSAT-4a, which was launched as part of a turnkey contract between Japan’s Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation (B-SAT) and U.S.-based satellite manufacturer SSL. Intelsat 37e was deployed first in the flight sequence, separating from Ariane 5 at 29 minutes after liftoff, followed approximately 18 minutes later by BSAT-4a.

Liftoff of Arianespace’s Ariane 5 with Intelsat 37e and BSAT-4a

Another “Epic” launch for Intelsat

Intelsat 37e – built by Boeing using a 702MP platform – is the latest satellite from Intelsat’s high-throughput EpicNG series to be launched. It also marks the fourth EpicNG spacecraft orbited by Arianespace to date (following Ariane 5 missions with Intelsat 29e and Intelsat 33e in January and August 2016, respectively, plus last February’s heavy-lift flight that lofted SKY Brasil-1/Intelsat 32e).

Overall, Intelsat 37e is the 59th Intelsat satellite launched by Arianespace since 1983, as well as the 55th Boeing-produced spacecraft orbited by the company – continuing a partnership that extends back to 1987. The Arianespace order book includes two more Boeing satellites: Horizon-3e and ViaSat 3F1.

Intelsat 37e satellite

Weighing an estimated 6,440 kg. at liftoff, Intelsat 37e will provide capacity for wireless backhaul, enterprise VSAT and mobility networks, carrying out its mission from a 342-deg. East orbital slot.

The launch leader for Japan

The second-released passenger on today’s successful Ariane 5 flight, BSAT-4a, will be used for Direct-To-Home (DTH) television relay in Japan, as well as to expand the availability of advanced television services (such as 4K/8K ultra-high definition TV). It will operate from a final orbital position of 110 deg. East.

Arianespace has launched all B-SAT satellites since this company’s creation, reflecting an unmatched position in the market. Since 1989, Arianespace has lofted a total of 29 GTO satellites for Japanese operators, representing more than 75 percent of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) market share in Japan.

BSAT-4a satellite

Arianespace’s launch of BSAT-4a also continues its long-running partnership with SSL, having now launched a total of 64 satellites produced by this manufacturer since 1983 – with three more in the company’s order book (Azerspace2/Intelsat-38, Eutelsat 7C, and Intelsat 39).

Arianespace’s 2017 launch calendar

Flight VA239 was Arianespace’s ninth launch in 2017, and it follows other heavy-lift Ariane 5 missions performed this year on February 14 (carrying SKY Brasil-1 and Telkom 3S), May 4 (SGDC and KOREASAT-7), June 1 (ViaSat-2 and EUTELSAT 172B) and June 28 (Hellas Sat 3-Inmarsat S EAN and GSAT-17).

Also conducted earlier in 2017 were Arianespace’s medium-lift Soyuz missions on January 27 (with Hispasat 36W-1) and May 18 (SES-15); plus light-lift Vega flights performed March 6 (Sentinel-2B) and August 1 (OPTSAT-3000 and Venµs).

Related links:

Intelsat website: http://www.intelsat.com/

B-SAT website: http://www.b-sat.co.jp/english

Boeing website: http://www.boeing.com/space

SSL website: http://www.sslmda.com/

For more information about Arianespace, visit: http://www.arianespace.com/

Images, Video, Text, Credits: Arianespace/SSL/Boeing.

Best regards, Orbiter.ch

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