mardi 24 février 2015

Timelapse: LHC experiments prepare for restart












CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research logo.

February 24, 2015

video
ALMOST READY TO RESTART

The LHC is preparing to restart at almost double the collision energy of its previous run. The new energy will allow physicists to check previously untestable theories, and explore new frontiers in particle physics.

When the LHC is on, counter-rotating beams of particles will be made to collide at four interaction points 100 metres underground, around which sit the huge detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb.

In the video above, engineers and technicians prepare these four detectors to receive the showers of particles that will be created in collisions at energies of 13 TeV. The giant endcaps of the ATLAS detector are back in position and the wheels of the CMS detector are moving it back into its "closed" configuration. The huge red door of the ALICE experiment is closed up ready for restart, and the access door to the LHC tunnel is sealed with concrete blocks.

Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

The LHC will start up again end of March. Read about how the machine has changed since its previous run: http://press.web.cern.ch/backgrounders/lhc-season-2-stronger-machine

Note:

CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world’s largest and most respected centres for scientific research. Its business is fundamental physics, finding out what the Universe is made of and how it works. At CERN, the world’s largest and most complex scientific instruments are used to study the basic constituents of matter — the fundamental particles. By studying what happens when these particles collide, physicists learn about the laws of Nature.

The instruments used at CERN are particle accelerators and detectors. Accelerators boost beams of particles to high energies before they are made to collide with each other or with stationary targets. Detectors observe and record the results of these collisions.

Founded in 1954, the CERN Laboratory sits astride the Franco–Swiss border near Geneva. It was one of Europe’s first joint ventures and now has 22 Member States.

Related links:

CERN's two-year shutdown drawing to a close: http://orbiterchspacenews.blogspot.ch/2015/02/cerns-two-year-shutdown-drawing-to-close.html

For more information about the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), visit: http://home.web.cern.ch/

Image, Video, Text, Credits: CERN/Cian O'Luanaigh.

Best regards, Orbiter.ch

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